From the Studio

thoughts on art and process in action from a contemporary artist

Posts Tagged ‘work in progress

Natural Dyeing for Sukkah Project

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I’ve been invited to inhabit the Sukkah at the Contemporary Jewish Museum (San Francisco) on October 8th for one day of the holiday of Sukkot.  They invited six artists to each take a day to create an open studio or installation project inside the frame of the Sukkah.  I decided to take the opportunity to do a new Participatory Installation piece within that frame entitled Refuge of Leaves.

Process

These are photos of the dyeing process for this new project.  These are the first three batches, using pomegranate dye, rhubarb dye and artichoke dye.  Each dye changes depending on if I scour the paper first, or if I add a mordant, or if I add iron.  I did every combination on four kinds of paper to get a wider variety.

As I’m going, I allow the paper to show some marks- wrinkles, the mark of the iron, irregularities, etc.  Showing their history, that they have been through something, a difficult process that may even damage them seemed like a perfect parallel to individuals seeking refuge, to people who had a story to tell.

About the Piece

Traditionally a Sukkah is a symbolic ritual space of refuge in the wilderness created for the holiday of Sukkot in the Jewish faith and tradition. “Refuge of Leaves” creates a Sukkah as a space for reflection where people from many backgrounds can reflect on and share their personal experiences of refuge from “wildernesses”, whether physical or metaphorical. As a Sukkah it symbolizes a liminal space of safety within the wilderness between worlds.

I followed traditional aspects of the Sukkah in using natural plant-based materials in the form of a variety of papers from different places and times, including papyrus as well as paper that could be put through a modern printer.  These are for participants to write responses to their choice of prompts on the subject of refuge.  I am hand-dyeing the papers with natural dyes to mimic the color range of plants one might build a traditional sukkah from. The dyeing processes also makes each piece of paper individual in color and texture, just like the people writing their responses.

The word “leaves” in the title functions in a number of ways.  The individual leaves of paper in a larger book, the plant leaves that form a traditional Sukkah, and the nature of a this kind of refuge as a temporary shelter (not a home) that eventually requires one to leave.  The structure is very literally a refuge made of leaves that each participant leaves behind.

As part of this project I will be there from 10AM until 4PM to discuss my work and facilitate the process.  Please join me.

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in-process on “Between the Lines (Experience Exchange)”

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sprectrum-side These are the first set of “pages” for participants in Between the Lines (Experience Exchange) to write on.  The materials are translucent acrylics on vellum with bookbinding thread sewn into the tops to tie them into the structure.

The piece was commissioned by the College of the Redwoods for their annual Book of the Year celebration.  This year’s book is Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates.

The structure of the piece is a large sculpture created a s a physical framing of some of the book’s core concepts  (I saw them, but also based  on interviews with the author, reviews, and discussions with other people).  The questions also derive from the book, and will ask participants to respond with their own related experiences.

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Dyeing wrap up

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Just some images of my yarn as I dye it and arrange it to see how my color balance for iteration #10 of Identity Tapestry for the Identity show at Vögele Cultural Center is going.

I’m nearly there!  I just need some more blues in the medium darkness range of all hues.  Here you can see on the white plastic sheeting some of the yarn I am dyeing over to create all the richness and depth of color in the yarn for the piece.

I am contemplating using a different size of plaque for the statements because of the nature of German (more text needs more space).  This would bring the format closer to “hello my name is” labels, which I like, but I need to be sure I can find the right sized stickers for the look I want.  I could physically do the text without stickers, but the label/name tag/address reference label stickers give is important to me for this piece.  I may end up ordering metric ones.

Coldworking Day One

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So far so good.  I’ve used a dremel on silver and brass before, but never glass.  Working around the constant flow of water is a new experience.  I can understand why people don’t tend to do detail work in this medium.  Seeing detail in a clear substance while water is running over it is a little tricky.

More casting flaws are visible now that I’m working the glass, but I think they are still ones I can work around.  I’ll know better once I do a light sandblast.

In the meantime the fabric mold for the body is ready for the foam pour on Thursday.

Written by marycoreymarch

April 28, 2010 at 5:16 am

Kiln survival

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unmolding the glass head

I’ve just un-molded the head and thankfully things went more or less alright in the kiln.  The defects that happened are in places where they don’t matter (under the hair line).  No fractures, no breaks.  There are a few discolorations inside the face, possibly from stray material in the broken glass I used.  In future I’ll know not to use glass someone else has broken- unknowns are too likely.

A trace of carbon, probably from some wax trapped in a small corner caused some discoloration on the tip of the mask’s bird-tail (seen in the photo).

Still-= the parts that matter are clear.  I was expecting and even hoping for a little distortion in the image, so bubbles are fine.  I was actually planning to warp the images I projected.  I’m waiting to see how much the glass warps the image before I start though.

She came out well.

One thought I’m having is that even if I sandblast the areas besides the mask and eyes it may still be too transparent and too clear rather than white.  I might get a better effect if I used a thin layer of oil with wax medium worked into the skin.  Have to see how well (or if) it will hold though.  I imagine that once it’s sandblasted the surface will take wax nicely.  It would give it a little more opacity without going opaque and a more skin-like texture.

Written by marycoreymarch

April 23, 2010 at 9:28 pm

mask on, and now to the kiln…

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The project is coming along.  I used the shape of Simone’s mask almost exactly.

I added a little bit of detail on the top edge and over the eyes in the style of a Venetian mask to help distinguish it from some sort of super-hero mask (which I think the context, clothes and hair will do the rest of the way).  For some reason with the mask on she reminds me of Athena, who has no mask (but perhaps it is similar to the helmet she is often shown with).

The wax sculpture is now invested in the plaster and needs to be melted out and the plaster given time to cure before I can get the glass in and load it into the kiln.  The red parts in the picture are “sprews”- added bits that get removed in the cold-working process that help prevent bubbles forming in the glass.

I haven’t done anything with glass before, but firing a glass kiln is much like firing a ceramics kiln (which I have done lots of).  The most atheistic people will start praying to the kiln gods during this process- only half in jest.  When you put something into the kiln you just have to let it go and hope that everything works out as it should.  You can control many parts of the process, but ultimately you never know what can happen in there.  So… I will put it into the kiln next Wednesday and say my little prayers to the kiln gods… and hope that everything that I put into the sculpture comes out in the glass… and doesn’t pour all over the kiln, crack the mold, or do one of many other things that can happen in the kiln.

Then the long process of cold-working (removing sprews, detailing, adding texture, etc.).

In the meantime I’m figuring out how to do the hands, and I’ll have to see if I can find some mannequin arms that work.  If not, I’ll be building those as well.  The sewing continues and I plan to do the bustle next.

The structure of bustles is fascinating stuff.  I’m thinking of all kinds of things I can do for making a piece of clothing that shows the bustle structure itself… just for fun, when this project is done.

Written by marycoreymarch

April 2, 2010 at 3:27 am

Face sculpted

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Well, aside from the inevitable thousand tiny touch-ups, the face is done.  I’m going to make a mold of her before I start trying out the mask options or put her in the kiln.  I could easily destroy her with a mask that I decide doesn’t work, and accidents happen in the kiln.

It’s nice to sculpt again.  I just realized it’s been at least 8 years!  I’ve been doing more painting, drawing and other mediums for installation.

I think sometimes one gets better at things in the time between the actual doing of it.  My eye has gotten better and I haven’t forgotten how to use my hands.

On another note I loved working at the Crucible.  It’s a wonderful space, and so nice to know I have access to all sorts of great equipment for working with metal, glass, wood, and clay.  In other good news, Techshop is opening a branch in SF, so I won’t have far to drive to have access to laser cutters, milling machines, 3D printers and other more high-tech tools when I need them.

Written by marycoreymarch

March 16, 2010 at 3:18 am