From the Studio

thoughts on art and process in action from a contemporary artist

Posts Tagged ‘collaborative projects

Scenes of Surveillance

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A few scenes from the Bearing Witness Show of the pieces, artist talks and performances.

I’ve just added Digital Breadcrumbs (M.I.S.S.T)  and Online Profile to my website.

Bearing Witness: Surveillance in the Drone Age is Opening Tomorrow!

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text on podiumsm

Link to San Francisco International Arts Festival information

Link to Bearing Witness as part of San Francisco International Arts Festival

Calender for Bearing Witness: Surveillance In The Drone Age
May 21 – Jun 7, 2015 Fort Mason Center, SF
The San Francisco International Arts Festival and curators Hanna Regev and Matt McKinley present:Bearing Witness: Surveillance In The Drone Age

May 21 – Jun 7, 2015 Fort Mason Center SF, Ca

Curator’s Tour 1 – May 23 1 – 2:30pm

Convene in the Fleet Room at 1pm for viewing and discussion of works in this location before heading to the Herbst Pavilion and Cowell Theater Atrium where the tour concludes with a performance of Latifa Medjdoub’s ‘Conversations With The Root’ in the Cowell Theater Lobby at 2pm; free event

Curator’s Tour 2 – May 30 Noon – 1:30pm

Convene in the Fleet Room at 12pm for a special performance of Kinetech’s ‘Mirror #1, Time Bubble’ followed by a viewing and discussion of works in this location before heading to the Cowell Theater Lobby and Atrium. The tour concludes at 1pm with an encore performance of Igor Josifov’s ‘Wit-ness’ performance in the Herbst Pavilion; free even

Show Description:

“Bearing Witness: Surveillance in the Drone Age” is a comprehensive look at the wide reach and capabilities of technologies that trap us under a complex umbrella of surveillance technologies consisting of drones, phones and ubiquitous cameras and tether us together in unprecedented ways thanks to social media and the Internet at large. This exhibit is an opportunity to engage in conversation about the potential benefits of surveillance technology as well as the threats posed to fundamental rights of personal freedom and privacy.

The idea that as individuals we watch and, in turn, are watched on a local to a global scale within groups we self-select and by ‘eyes’ we will never see is the greatest source of angst within our current milieu of evolution toward a globally wired community. The prevalence of digital surveillance combined with ‘analog’ surveillance makes personal privacy a diminishing and prized commodity. The by-products of digital surveillance (pictures and video) immortalize both personal and public events and this documentation is readily accessible thanks to cheap memory and social pressure to network and share digitally. Easy access to information capturing devices and storage allows for unprecedented documentation of all types of data, innocuous to important, in massive quantity, which not only leaves behind the greatest footprint of a single generation’s existence, ever, but poses real threats to our identities, rights to privacy, and unique ways of experiencing life.

This exhibit features work by:
Shay Arick, Alex Benedict (1030 Art Group), Tana Lehr (1030 Art Group), Yoni Mayeri (1030 Art Group), Teddy Milder (1030 Art Group), Jane Norling (1030 Art Group), Lanny Weingrod (1030 Art Group), Anna Kaminska (1030 Art Group) and Michel Bohbot, Matthew Silverberg (1030 Art Group), Lark Buckingham, artPaul Cartier, Irene Carvajal & Alex Shepard, Justin Hoover & Rachel Znerold, Phillip Hua, Philippe Jestin, Igor Josifov, Ali Kaaf, Pantea Karimi, Jonathon Keats, Scott Kildall, Mary March & Christopher Saari, Kara Maria, Latifa Medjdoub, Wes Modes (Co-related Space), Lanier Sammons (Co-related Space), Brent Townshend (Co-related Space), Daniel Newman, Maya Smira, Melissa West, Weidong Yang (Kinetech), Daiana Lopes da Silva (Kinetech), Lisa Blatt, Tayeb Al Hafez, Antoine Kem, Trevor Paglen

Featured Events:

Panel Discussion: The Edward Snowden Revelations and the Public Right To Know – May 30 1:30 – 3pm

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and artists Phillip Hua and 1030 Art Group members in conversation with curators Hanna Regev and Matt McKinley; free event
About the Festival:

The San Francisco International Arts Festival (www.sfiaf.org) celebrates the arts by bringing together a global community of artists and audiences. The organization presents innovative projects that are focused on increasing human awareness and understanding. SFIAF’s curatorial priorities include developing collaborative projects led by Bay Area artists working with their national and international peers and presenting world-class international artists who often do not have US representation and whose work is rarely (or never previously) seen in the United States.

Artists Discussion Panel- Endangered Languages in the Information Age next Thursday

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Tomorrow night is the opening reception for Living With Endangered Languages in the Information Age! We are also having a panel discussion centering around the role of technology in Languages and Art on the 15th.  Please join us!

EndangeredLanguagePanel

Living with Endangered Languages in the Information Age (curated by Hanna Regev)
2nd Sat Reception: Saturday, January 10, 2015 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm
Exhibition Dates: Jan 7, 2015 to Jan 31, 2015
3rd Thursday Artist Panel Discussion: Thursday, January 15, 2015 – 5:00pm to 8:00pm
Including CREATIVE STATION, free all-ages art activities in our Classroom.

More on the show here: https://www.rootdivision.org/exhibition-rd-gallery/living-endangered-languages-information-age

Living With Endangered Languages in the Information Age show Opening next weekend!

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TheLiving With Endangered Languages in the Information Age” show at Root Division is opening on the 7th!  I will have my new mixed media sound installation Cultural Fabric Breathes Still there waiting for you.

Much thanks to curator Hanna Regev, the participants (who chose to remain anonymous), to technical collaborator Dan Garcia.

        Opening Reception: Saturday, January 10, 2015 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm
Exhibition Dates: Jan 7, 2015 to Jan 31, 2015
3rd Thursday Artist Panel Discussion: Thursday, January 15, 2015 – 5:00pm to 8:00pm
I hope to see you there!

Endangered Languages Piece- participate!

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capture of UNESCO's interactive map of endangered languages from http://www.unesco.org/culture/languages-atlas/en/atlasmap.html

capture of UNESCO’s interactive map of endangered languages from http://www.unesco.org/culture/languages-atlas/en/atlasmap.html

I am gathering endangered words for an artwork and I need speakers of endangered languages to participate in my project.

I have been invited to be part of an exhibition on Endangered Languages curated by Hanna Regev which will begin at Root Division in San Francisco.

I need to collect audio samples of certain words in endangered languages for the piece I will include in the show.  There is a physical element to the work, but the text and the sound of each language are essential to it.

I am looking for words that say something that isn’t easily translatable into more commonly spoken languages, possibly words that hints at the culture. For example: “tattybogle” is a lovely Scotts word (a language on the endangered list) but it directly translates into the English “scarecrow” so I would not count it. The word “tingo” (Pascuense , Easter Island) is better. On Altalang.com it is translated as “the act of taking objects one desires from the house of a friend by gradually borrowing all of them.”  This is a word which gives you a window into a culture that would produce such a word and takes a clever sentence to translate into a more  commonly spoken language.

What I need for my work is words like that from Endangered languages, spoken and explained on audio by speakers of those languages. Amazingly I’m already finding a fair few… on the internet. Mostly at this point it is friends of friends, but I hope to expand. If you speak an endangered language and would like to be part of the piece, please contact me at contact@marymarch.com with the subject heading “endangered languages”.

One component of the show is the effect of technology on languages.  Are dominant Languages like English, Mandarin and Spanish just taking over because of media and the internet or does the internet create opportunities to connect and encourage speakers of endangered languages? My thought is probably both, but I am finding that the internet is fantastic for connecting with people who speak endangered languages- something that may itself become part of the piece.

UPDATE (12/1):  I am still collecting Audio samples through the end of November. Please contact me if you can contribute. You may remain anonymous in the public project information if you like.  It’s basically a 15-30min Skype, Google Hangouts or Facetime call (which you can turn the video part of off) where I record the word or phrase, your translation and a personal thought or story about them. 

INFORMATION

To see if a language you speak is on the endangered list see Wikipedia’s Lists of Endangered Languages by area.

The United Nations has an interactive map of endangered languages here.

Another great interactive map is here on the Endangered Languages Project site.

For more information on me and my work as an artist, see my website at www.marymarch.com (I suggest the installation and “About the Artist sections in this case).

Living Guestbook- Materials

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MATERIALSThese are some of the materials for my next installation.  The swatches at the bottom are some dye, starch and ink tests.  Each of these base colors (including the white) will be over-dyed in small strips for the piece.  If I don’t get the color variety I want with these base colors in the first few rounds of dyeing, I’ll go  back into the process with more fabric.

The physical format will be similar to Dream Blanket and Transparency: a weaving with the empty warp, structured with a grid of weft, with the main weft made out of strips of this fabric.  Visitors to this collector’s home will be invited to respond to questions about memory, impressions and experience.  They will then get to write these on a strip of dyed dupioni silk that has been starched for structure and to better take the ink.

Visually I made the piece to fit the rustic quality of their vacation home in Vermont.  It will even include existing objects from the house and grounds.  I really love work like this.  Working to specific spaces like the theater and this home is wonderful.  I like making a piece in a way I might not have thought of without the constraints or benefits of a certain goal and space, or without the interaction of other people involved.  I enjoy collaborative work, and I consider working with a curator, institution or collector to be another form of collaboration.

I’m looking forward to this piece!

Duly Stimulated

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The collaborative project I organized is doing its work.  I have been duly stimulated and have already come up with a new piece a step outside my recent thinking.

Both Annysa Ng’s and Sophie Menuet’s figurative work have given me a little desire to do an austere sculptural figure.   Katharina Fritsch’s “Monk” 1999) has stuck in my head for a long time too, and it is similarly austere- matte-black, simple.

In this case the project is to combine the concept submitted by one artist(s) with the iconic image from another.  Sophie’s mask/bird image got me.  The freedom of a mask, the idea of revealing something internal through veiling.  And Annysa’s concept was the invisible concept made visible.  On Friday I was admiring some cast glass work at the DeYoung and I had an itch to try it.  Last night everything came together in my mind… along with my hobby of costuming and sewing.

I picture a cast-glass face (which is generally a frosty white if the glass is clear).  The figure in matte-white, austere, feminine and restrained.  After looking through my costume books and resources, pinpointing my historical time-lines, 1890 seemed like the perfect period- a time when women had suffrage on the horizon (or if you were from New Zealand you had just gotten it), but were in some ways more socially constrained than they ever had been.  The clothes are restrictive, defined, and yet more simple in some ways than the clothing just before or after.

So I picture her, this figure, in white, with a face of cast glass… but in the shape of a mask, the face is clear, and in the clear, colorful images move inside.

In a way it also fits into Simone Stoll’s “unquiet mind” concept as well.

I can do it with a short-throw projector and a single-surface mirror or two.  I think I have the patterns I want for the dress.   I’ll be taking a glass-casting workshop, and there are details to work out, but I’m  very excited about the piece.  The images themselves will take some thought… but they must be colorful, intense and passionate.

Written by Mary Corey March

January 27, 2010 at 11:34 am