From the Studio

thoughts on art and process in action from a contemporary artist

Posts Tagged ‘art shows

#DadaTarot: the first readings

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I created this project for a show celebrating the 100th anniversary of Dada.  I made the #DadaTaroT deck out of two sets of images: 21 red wood and laser-etched cardboard symbol cards, and over 200 media image cards on laser-etched cardboard.

 

The method was simple: a pair of people (strangers, lovers, friends…) would be invited by the performers dressed in carnival-esque gear to each ask a question which they could not at that moment know the answer to.  One person would ask (aloud or in silence) and then select one red card and two brown cards.  The partner would then use the cards to attempt to answer the person’s question.  Then they switch.  I documented each one in rough and ready fashion with a photo and hastily hand-written notes.  These are the results.

The Dadaists were coming out of the horror of WWI that left many of their generation feeling that life was meaningless and absurd: Religion, Government, Philosophy and Art seemed to have utterly failed to provide meaning in the context of that horror.  The Dadaists embraced and exposed the absurdity.

I used Tarot because it seemed to be a perfect intersection of the randomness that a lot of dada art has employed through the use of games of chance together with a random assault of media and symbolism wherein we search for meaning.  In the end it is about what each person brings to it and what they _want_ to find, but as in all interactions it’s not just our interpretations, but the interpretations of those around to us, or even close to us that have an effect.  Our negotiation of those interpretations of our world together are what interests me as an artist.  This exchange provided a platform for mini exchanges and negotiations of how we interpret our shared world.

So many interesting things happened during this project, only a few of which are visible in these records- the best of it was within the interaction.  It is very much is about what people bring to it.

Identity Tapestry to show in Switzerland

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vkz_ueber20unsFrom the first iterations of Identity Tapestry I’ve been wanting to create it both in a museum space and in another language.  I’m pleased to announce that this May I’ll be doing both!  Identity Tapestry will be up as part of the upcoming show “Identity” for four months starting this May at the Vögele Cultural Center in Pfäffikon (just outside Zurich).

I will be flying out for the install and I’m incredibly excited.  Any iteration demands a look at which statements to include or leave or if new ones ought to be added, especially in a new area or situation. In this case the language use should be especially interesting because there are essentially two languages at work there: High German and Swiss German.  One is the official language which is used for nearly all text, the other is the language of intimate conversations and the inside of one’s own head.  Apparently it is only recently that the Swiss-German language has appeared in text, and then mostly in text messages, and only to very intimate friends.  How I approach these languages and navigate translations will add new levels of complexity to the piece.  Thankfully the curatorial staff is wonderful and I have a local Zurich-raised person who is willing to consult with me on language as well.

The Crucible of Deadlines and Constraints

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hand on fireMy problem as an artist has never been lack of ideas or even crafting skills.  The real skill is deciding what is most important and when, what not to do, what to sacrifice, what to put the most time and effort into.  Drawing itself is an act of selection- what line to place, what line to ignore, what line to emphasize, tweak, or ghost.

So right now I have a good problem for an artist- two shows at the same time.  One I committed to months ago, but without a specific piece.  Since I knew I could have more space for that show I prepared to spread out and create a larger installed environment.  Then I was invited to be in a show in a museum just outside Zurich, Switzerland.  They wanted a specific piece, and it is one I have to be there to put together.  And they open two days apart.

Now that the Switzerland one is confirmed I’m turning back to the first one.  Suddenly I have more constraints.  Something that can run itself.  Something smaller and easy to install.  Still something interactive.  In the case of this show, something both contemporary and Dada. I was intimately familiar with Dada before I left high school and I loved it then, but two more advanced art degrees have actually put me at more of a distance.  So I dove back to the source.  I re-read the manifestos, looked back at the beginnings and what motivated them.  Suddenly an entire new interactive, small, easy to set up artwork burst out of my head.  And it will work.  And it comes right out of the unconscious pool of all the ideas I am constantly exploring. Better still, because the process of Dada involves some randomness, it will be fun and surprising to make.  I’m excited.

When I have enough time and resources to do whatever I want without a burning idea starting in my mind and a place to put the result I do very little that gets finished.  Give me a place, a time, and a single constraint or direction and suddenly my mind is on fire and my hands itching to create.

Scenes of Surveillance

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A few scenes from the Bearing Witness Show of the pieces, artist talks and performances.

I’ve just added Digital Breadcrumbs (M.I.S.S.T)  and Online Profile to my website.

Bearing Witness: Surveillance in the Drone Age is Opening Tomorrow!

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text on podiumsm

Link to San Francisco International Arts Festival information

Link to Bearing Witness as part of San Francisco International Arts Festival

Calender for Bearing Witness: Surveillance In The Drone Age
May 21 – Jun 7, 2015 Fort Mason Center, SF
The San Francisco International Arts Festival and curators Hanna Regev and Matt McKinley present:Bearing Witness: Surveillance In The Drone Age

May 21 – Jun 7, 2015 Fort Mason Center SF, Ca

Curator’s Tour 1 – May 23 1 – 2:30pm

Convene in the Fleet Room at 1pm for viewing and discussion of works in this location before heading to the Herbst Pavilion and Cowell Theater Atrium where the tour concludes with a performance of Latifa Medjdoub’s ‘Conversations With The Root’ in the Cowell Theater Lobby at 2pm; free event

Curator’s Tour 2 – May 30 Noon – 1:30pm

Convene in the Fleet Room at 12pm for a special performance of Kinetech’s ‘Mirror #1, Time Bubble’ followed by a viewing and discussion of works in this location before heading to the Cowell Theater Lobby and Atrium. The tour concludes at 1pm with an encore performance of Igor Josifov’s ‘Wit-ness’ performance in the Herbst Pavilion; free even

Show Description:

“Bearing Witness: Surveillance in the Drone Age” is a comprehensive look at the wide reach and capabilities of technologies that trap us under a complex umbrella of surveillance technologies consisting of drones, phones and ubiquitous cameras and tether us together in unprecedented ways thanks to social media and the Internet at large. This exhibit is an opportunity to engage in conversation about the potential benefits of surveillance technology as well as the threats posed to fundamental rights of personal freedom and privacy.

The idea that as individuals we watch and, in turn, are watched on a local to a global scale within groups we self-select and by ‘eyes’ we will never see is the greatest source of angst within our current milieu of evolution toward a globally wired community. The prevalence of digital surveillance combined with ‘analog’ surveillance makes personal privacy a diminishing and prized commodity. The by-products of digital surveillance (pictures and video) immortalize both personal and public events and this documentation is readily accessible thanks to cheap memory and social pressure to network and share digitally. Easy access to information capturing devices and storage allows for unprecedented documentation of all types of data, innocuous to important, in massive quantity, which not only leaves behind the greatest footprint of a single generation’s existence, ever, but poses real threats to our identities, rights to privacy, and unique ways of experiencing life.

This exhibit features work by:
Shay Arick, Alex Benedict (1030 Art Group), Tana Lehr (1030 Art Group), Yoni Mayeri (1030 Art Group), Teddy Milder (1030 Art Group), Jane Norling (1030 Art Group), Lanny Weingrod (1030 Art Group), Anna Kaminska (1030 Art Group) and Michel Bohbot, Matthew Silverberg (1030 Art Group), Lark Buckingham, artPaul Cartier, Irene Carvajal & Alex Shepard, Justin Hoover & Rachel Znerold, Phillip Hua, Philippe Jestin, Igor Josifov, Ali Kaaf, Pantea Karimi, Jonathon Keats, Scott Kildall, Mary March & Christopher Saari, Kara Maria, Latifa Medjdoub, Wes Modes (Co-related Space), Lanier Sammons (Co-related Space), Brent Townshend (Co-related Space), Daniel Newman, Maya Smira, Melissa West, Weidong Yang (Kinetech), Daiana Lopes da Silva (Kinetech), Lisa Blatt, Tayeb Al Hafez, Antoine Kem, Trevor Paglen

Featured Events:

Panel Discussion: The Edward Snowden Revelations and the Public Right To Know – May 30 1:30 – 3pm

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and artists Phillip Hua and 1030 Art Group members in conversation with curators Hanna Regev and Matt McKinley; free event
About the Festival:

The San Francisco International Arts Festival (www.sfiaf.org) celebrates the arts by bringing together a global community of artists and audiences. The organization presents innovative projects that are focused on increasing human awareness and understanding. SFIAF’s curatorial priorities include developing collaborative projects led by Bay Area artists working with their national and international peers and presenting world-class international artists who often do not have US representation and whose work is rarely (or never previously) seen in the United States.

Artists Discussion Panel- Endangered Languages in the Information Age next Thursday

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Tomorrow night is the opening reception for Living With Endangered Languages in the Information Age! We are also having a panel discussion centering around the role of technology in Languages and Art on the 15th.  Please join us!

EndangeredLanguagePanel

Living with Endangered Languages in the Information Age (curated by Hanna Regev)
2nd Sat Reception: Saturday, January 10, 2015 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm
Exhibition Dates: Jan 7, 2015 to Jan 31, 2015
3rd Thursday Artist Panel Discussion: Thursday, January 15, 2015 – 5:00pm to 8:00pm
Including CREATIVE STATION, free all-ages art activities in our Classroom.

More on the show here: https://www.rootdivision.org/exhibition-rd-gallery/living-endangered-languages-information-age

Living With Endangered Languages in the Information Age show Opening next weekend!

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TheLiving With Endangered Languages in the Information Age” show at Root Division is opening on the 7th!  I will have my new mixed media sound installation Cultural Fabric Breathes Still there waiting for you.

Much thanks to curator Hanna Regev, the participants (who chose to remain anonymous), to technical collaborator Dan Garcia.

        Opening Reception: Saturday, January 10, 2015 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm
Exhibition Dates: Jan 7, 2015 to Jan 31, 2015
3rd Thursday Artist Panel Discussion: Thursday, January 15, 2015 – 5:00pm to 8:00pm
I hope to see you there!

Still Collecting words for Endangered Languages artwork. Participate!

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I am still collecting languages for my Endangered Languages Project!

What it involves:  if you speak an endangered language or dialect (list here) I would want to speak with you for 15-30 minutes over the phone, skype, google hangouts or facetime.  You would not need to turn on the video part if it is over the computer. Basically I would just record audio of the following:

-a word or phrase that you feel doesn’t quite translate and which may say something about the culture

-your translation of that word or phrase

-a personal thought or story about it.

Other information I’d collect is where you grew up and where you live now, and what sort of fabric you would suggest goes with the language.  For example: the Irish speaker suggested a brown tweed, the Lowland Scots suggested a Douglas Tartan wool, and the Estonian speaker suggested a natural linen embroidered in a traditional pattern (which I am embroidering).  Otherwise no information about you (name, etc.) would be included unless you would like me to include your name in a “thanks to” list.

I am making a sort of cabinet where the fabrics will be displayed.  When a person approaches, one of the languages will start to play and the corresponding fabric with move with air as if the breath of the speaker is moving it.  It will mimic a Natural History display in certain ways… except with an emphasis on these things still being very much alive.

If you would like to participate, please email me at contact@marymarch.com

This piece is part of a an art exhibition on Endangered Languages curated by Hanna Regev at Root Division in San Francisco which is potentially traveling afterwards.  Previous post here.

Written by Mary Corey March

December 2, 2014 at 2:05 am

Endangered Languages Piece- participate!

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capture of UNESCO's interactive map of endangered languages from http://www.unesco.org/culture/languages-atlas/en/atlasmap.html

capture of UNESCO’s interactive map of endangered languages from http://www.unesco.org/culture/languages-atlas/en/atlasmap.html

I am gathering endangered words for an artwork and I need speakers of endangered languages to participate in my project.

I have been invited to be part of an exhibition on Endangered Languages curated by Hanna Regev which will begin at Root Division in San Francisco.

I need to collect audio samples of certain words in endangered languages for the piece I will include in the show.  There is a physical element to the work, but the text and the sound of each language are essential to it.

I am looking for words that say something that isn’t easily translatable into more commonly spoken languages, possibly words that hints at the culture. For example: “tattybogle” is a lovely Scotts word (a language on the endangered list) but it directly translates into the English “scarecrow” so I would not count it. The word “tingo” (Pascuense , Easter Island) is better. On Altalang.com it is translated as “the act of taking objects one desires from the house of a friend by gradually borrowing all of them.”  This is a word which gives you a window into a culture that would produce such a word and takes a clever sentence to translate into a more  commonly spoken language.

What I need for my work is words like that from Endangered languages, spoken and explained on audio by speakers of those languages. Amazingly I’m already finding a fair few… on the internet. Mostly at this point it is friends of friends, but I hope to expand. If you speak an endangered language and would like to be part of the piece, please contact me at contact@marymarch.com with the subject heading “endangered languages”.

One component of the show is the effect of technology on languages.  Are dominant Languages like English, Mandarin and Spanish just taking over because of media and the internet or does the internet create opportunities to connect and encourage speakers of endangered languages? My thought is probably both, but I am finding that the internet is fantastic for connecting with people who speak endangered languages- something that may itself become part of the piece.

UPDATE (12/1):  I am still collecting Audio samples through the end of November. Please contact me if you can contribute. You may remain anonymous in the public project information if you like.  It’s basically a 15-30min Skype, Google Hangouts or Facetime call (which you can turn the video part of off) where I record the word or phrase, your translation and a personal thought or story about them. 

INFORMATION

To see if a language you speak is on the endangered list see Wikipedia’s Lists of Endangered Languages by area.

The United Nations has an interactive map of endangered languages here.

Another great interactive map is here on the Endangered Languages Project site.

For more information on me and my work as an artist, see my website at www.marymarch.com (I suggest the installation and “About the Artist sections in this case).

Flower installations multiply art?

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Bouquets to Art DeYoung 2009

Bouquets to Art at the DeYoung Museum did a wonderful thing to the museum space.  Each floral arrangement had the potential to rewrite the space and reinterpret the artwork.

Some arrangements  focused on mimicking representational elements of the artwork (floral pieces in the forms of dresses, or flowers arranged inside a bicycle for example).  Others took a tiny detail in the piece and called attention to it by expanding it far out of proportion (and in some cases adding color).

Many fit themselves into the pieces- capturing the color, style and movement in a piece.  Some brilliantly matched textures, and a very few were sculptures in their own right.  One or two floral pieces managed to work off of the entire room of art they were in so that they could be placed in the center and interact with the other pieces from every angle.

It was amazing.

And it put a new context on installation for me.  The floral show was in effect a collaborative installation piece which transformed not only the museum space but the art within it.  It was able to highlight, magnify, re-contextualize, frame, and comment on individual pieces and elements within them.

There is also something appealing about working with a material that is alive and yet already dying.  Transient, and yet so rich and vibrant and full of color.  I would not be surprised if living materials come into an installation piece of my own in time… as long as I don’t get seduced by the process and run off to be a florist.

The aspect of having an installation that so fully interacts with the museum around it is attractive as well.  …it invites a kind of camouflage piece.  That could be a series.  “Camouflaged Intruders”.  It follows the line of thinking I’ve had for some performance pieces I’ve had in mind for a while now.

Thoughts for later… for now, I have other work in process.  I will however go to see this year’s show when it returns next month.

Written by Mary Corey March

March 30, 2010 at 12:58 am

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